©2018 BY ANGELA DENKER

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Recent Published Works

PERSPECTIVE: A THANK-FILLED THANKSGIVING
LIVING LUTHERAN

Oct. 30, 2019

U.S. families and U.S. Christians (including Lutherans) have much to discuss this Thanksgiving. There is a need, especially for white families, to confront generational racism, sexism and prejudice. There is a need for families to talk about politics and where they see Jesus’ life, death and resurrection resounding or sounding a warning in the U.S. today.

But before those important conversations can begin, before we carve the turkey and watch the Detroit Lions lose again (maybe this year they’ll finally win), we have to break down the walls of misunderstanding, resentment and grief that have been built up in so many of our lives and so many of our families.

Many of us are wondering where we can begin—to heal and to talk together from different backgrounds, ages and walks of life. I believe this Thanksgiving may offer an opportunity to begin with giving thanks. Not in general—for family, health or friends—but in particular ways: naming our loved ones, naming our blessings, naming what holds our heads above the rushing sea in a world that often feels tumultuous.

Paul began his letter to the Philippians with words I remember every time I think of the ones I love: “I thank my God every time I remember you” (1:3). 

'RED STATE CHRISTIANS' AUTHOR EXPLORES PHENOMENON OF EVANGELICAL TRUMP VOTERS
COLUMBIA (MO.) TRIBUNE

Oct. 26, 2019

Evangelical Christians were motivated to vote for Donald Trump by a desire to overturn Roe v. Wade, a hatred of Hillary Clinton and a belief that Democrats had abandoned them, author Angela Denker told a jam-packed crowd Thursday at Skylark Bookshop.

3 WAYS THE CHURCH CAN SEPARATE NATIONAL PRIDE AND CHRISTIAN IDENTITY
THE ART OF TALEH

Oct. 24, 2019

LAST POINT: You might notice a common thread in each of these three steps. They all require having uncomfortable conversations and deep engagement with the Bible and the life of Jesus. I would argue that our churches should be doing these things anyway, so these steps naturally lead not only to a greater separation between national pride and Christian identity — they also help us to be stronger in our Christian faith and identity.

It’s not easy to have conversations where people disagree vehemently. It’s not easy to challenge peoples’ identity and understanding of Christianity as a primarily American faith. But doing so is worthwhile to put the focus in churches back where it should be, on following Jesus and loving God and one another.

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